Roland GR-300 and G-808

Info

gr 300 g 808 guitar synth_front

 

NAME: Roland GR-300 and G-808

TYPE: Synthesizer

MANUFACTURER: Roland

YEAR: 1980

DAY RATE: 85

WEEKLY RATE: 250

 

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gr 300 g 808 guitar synth_back

 

NAME: Roland GR-300 and G-808

TYPE: Synthesizer

MANUFACTURER: Roland

YEAR: 1980

DAY RATE: 85

WEEKLY RATE: 250

 

Story


At the end of the 1970s, Roland Corporation introduced the world to the GR-300 analog guitar synthesizer. While there have been numerous advancements in music technology since then, the GR-300 remains the pinnacle of analog guitar synthesis. Although the sound palette of the GR-300 is very limited, the GR-300 has the fastest, most accurate tracking ever developed. Unlike much of guitar-to-MIDI pitch recognition technology, the GR-300 guitar synthesizer does not require the player to adapt technique to get astonishing results.

It is not that the GR-300 ignores fret board misfires, or translates them into wildly inaccurate notes as some MIDI systems will. The GR-300 instead creates a unique analog synth equivalent. For example, the initial atonal pick attack is converted into a sound very reminiscent of the “spit” sound heard at the beginning of a trumpet phrase.

The GR-300 has two oscillators, both harmonically locked to the string pitch, but one oscillator can be offset by a range of plus or minus one octave. So it is possible to play one oscillator an octave below pitch, or to layer two oscillators together at the interval of a perfect fifth. These pitch intervals can be preset as pitch offset “A” and “B.” There is also an adjustable pitch rise and fall time, to create a portamento/glide effect. The -24 db per octave low-pass filter in the GR-300 also tracks pitch, so as pitch preset “A” or “B” are engaged, the filter will also change. Higher pitches open the filter more, making for a brighter sound. For more than 30 years, guitarist Pat Metheny has been thrilling audiences with his GR-300 solos. Pat will often engage the pitch offset to lift the end of his solos one octave up. Not only does this raise the pitch, but it also opens the filter up more, making for a brighter sound. The GR-300 includes a LFO vibrato circuit, and basic filter envelope modulation. There are controls for filter attack time and sensitivity, and the filter modulation can be inverted as well.

 

Specifications


6-voice polyphony
2 oscillators per voice
VCOs (voltage controlled oscillator) are directly harmonically locked to each string, but can be tuned separately
VCF (voltage controlled filter, low pass) -24 dB per octave, with envelope modulation (attack and sensitivity)
Low Frequency Oscillator, for Vibrato Effects
Built-in foot switch controls the VCO mode (single/dual), VCO harmonize pitch (detuning of the VCO’s), and VCF mode (on, bypass, or inverted)
Pedal control input for the VCF
The GR-300 can output either the guitar, the synth, or a mix of the two
Synchronized, flashing LED status indicators
Dimensions: 15.7″ (W) 11.4″ (D) 3.9″ (H)
Power Requirements: 20 watts
Response Time: 3.32 ms

Manual

Video


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